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Jul 202014
 

 

 

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Patrick Schwerdtfeger is a motivational speaker who can speak about Vladimir Putin, Russian politics or media bias at your next business event. Contact us to check availability. The full transcript of this video is included below.

Hi and welcome to another edition of Strategic Business Insights. So today we’re going to talk about Vladimir Putin, and the fact that Vladimir Putin is Russia’s Ronald Reagan. Obviously, Russia’s been in the news quite a bit recently with the conflict in Syria and now of course what’s happening in the Ukraine, and Vladimir Putin is a very interesting figure because obviously the Western media hates this guy and the Western political establishment hates this guy. We love to villainize Vladimir Putin and make him out to be the devil.

Well, let me tell you, there’s another side to this coin and that’s really what this video is about, is just kind of a little bit of awareness that in Russia they love Vladimir Putin. Vladimir Putin is like a combination of Ronald Reagan and James Bond. They love that guy. Now, I’m not saying they love him unanimously. When he had his election there were protests, so there is a faction of the Russian population that does not like Vladimir Putin, but for the most part, across the country and even in the region, Vladimir Putin is quite a popular political figure. He’s a good communicator. He’s a very decisive leader, he’s very decisive in his leadership, he makes decisions quickly and very black and white – there’s not a lot of gray area for him, and he stands up to the USA. He stands up to America, which they love because they don’t like America.

Now, keep in mind, the Russian economy is like tiny by comparison to the US. It’s like one-tenth the size of the US. In fact, the Russian economy is about the same size as the California economy. It’s even a little bit smaller than the California economy, I think. So Russia’s economy is quite small, but the reason it has such a huge footprint in world politics is mainly for two reasons.

Number one, the kind of Eurasian continent, which is the single biggest land mass on the globe, is dominated by Russia. Russia is a huge, huge country. It’s almost twice the size of Canada, and Canada is the second largest country on the planet. So Russia is huge, which means they’re a raw material treasure trove. They’ve got tons of raw materials and a lot of oil and a lot of gas. In fact, if you look at oil-exporting countries, Russia is number one and they are almost twice as much oil, or not quite but close to twice as much, as Saudi Arabia, which is second. So Russia has a huge amount of oil and they export a lot of oil.

Now, there’s a distinction that we need to make her because it affects Vladimir Putin’s footprint within his country and also around the world. So when a country exports oil, most countries that do that, they have leases essentially on their own land. So the companies that are taking the oil out of the ground and refining it and shipping it out, well, they get some of the profits for sure— and these oil companies do make an awful lot of profit as we all know—but a lot of the money goes straight to the government because it’s their land. This is happening certainly in Saudi Arabia and a lot of the other countries in the Middle East, and other countries like Venezuela of course gets a lot of money directly from oil exports, and of course Russia. Russia exports a huge amount of oil and a lot of that money goes straight to the government.

Now, if you compare that to the United States, most of the United States government’s money just comes from tax revenues, so they have to tax the individuals and corporations in the country and then get that money from them. But meanwhile, Russia, they tax their people, they tax their corporations, but they have another cash injection, which is from these oil sales. So the government in Russia gets an awful lot of money from exporting this oil, which means that Vladimir Putin has a disproportionate power. Given the size of his economy, he has more power than you would expect because they get all this money right to the government, which is why Russia can spend so much of their money developing their own weapons. And the whole Cold War and everything, the only reason that was even possible, really, because the economy in Russia was much smaller than the economy in the United States, so why were they competitive? Well, of course we found out after the fact that they really weren’t nearly as competitive as we thought during the Cold War, but even still the illusion of being competitive was there because the government in Russia got all this money from exporting oil and they could take all that money and use it to develop their military, their army, all their weaponry. Russia’s got a lot of arms and they sell arms around the world and they manufacture an awful lot of arms, and they can do that because they have money going directly into the government.

So that props up Vladimir Putin. He’s a powerful guy. He’s got access to a lot of money and he’s got access to a lot of weapons. And look, he’s ex-KGB, which is like essentially the CIA except maybe even worse. So the guy lies through his teeth. They make these absurd comments like “the United States infiltrates all these situations around the world and tries to influence things and, oh, we’re Russia, we don’t do that.” That’s not true at all. Russia’s got its fingers into everything and they’ve got their own operatives. Both sides are doing that, and certainly Ukraine is the best example of both Russia and the United States getting their people, their feet on the ground, and trying to influence things and influence peddling inside of the Ukraine whether it leans Western towards Europe or Eastern towards Russia.

So Vladimir Putin lies through his teeth, but the point of this video is to say, look, he’s not the devil in everybody’s eyes. There is a part of the world that really looks up to that guy and there’s a media establishment in Russia that props him up and really uses him as a guidepost of what they should be doing. They think he’s making the right choices and they think that we’re making the wrong choices here in America.

So one of the things that I do just to kind of balance my view of the world—and I travel a lot for my work and I’m always going to different countries. I’ve been to the Middle East in particular a number of times, so it’s very important for me to have a general understanding of the different points of view. And let me tell you something: American media like CNN, you are not going to get a balanced point of view by watching America media. So what I do, I get almost all of my news, my understanding of the world, from a series of four apps which I have on my phone, and they are the CNN app; the BBC app, which is in the UK; RT, which is Russia, and that’s owned by the Russian government so it’s very biased and pro-Russia, but it’s good to know that point of view; and then Al Jazeera, which is out of Qatar, or as some people say, KUH-tar, which is focused largely on the Muslim world and has a very different perspective. So CNN, BBC, RT, and Al Jazeera, and I try to look at those apps almost every day, and many times they talk about the same news story but they have completely different points of view. And I think it’s really important, especially if you’re in international business, if you travel, if you have customers internationally or if you have ambitions or aspirations to grow your business beyond our borders or maybe in a different part of the world already, is to have an understanding of what’s going on in different parts of the world.

And Vladimir Putin is a perfect example of someone who is demonized here in the United States and really across Western Europe as well, but meanwhile, in Russia, he’s quite often hailed as a hero and his legacy will last. He is Ronald Reagan of Russia. Ronald Reagan was a huge political figure here in the United States and people constantly refer back to Ronald Reagan as an outstanding leader. Whether you agree with that or not, it’s a reality in America. A lot of people look up to the leadership that Ronald Reagan provided during his eight years in the White House. Well, let me tell you, in Russia Vladimir Putin holds that exact same position and his legacy will last, and it’s good for you as a businessperson or just as a citizen of the globe to see both sides of that debate.

Thanks so much for watching this video. My name is Patrick, reminding you as always to think bigger about your business, think bigger about your life.

Patrick Schwerdtfeger is a keynote speaker who has spoken at conferences and conventions in North America, South America, Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Please click the button below to inquire about speaking fees and availability.
 

 

Jul 062014
 

 

 

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Patrick Schwerdtfeger is a motivational speaker who can speak about perfectionism, taking action and paralysis of analysis at your next business event. Contact us to check availability. The full transcript of this video is included below.

Hi and welcome to another edition of Strategic Business Insights. Today we’re going to talk about perfectionists. Are you a perfectionist? If you are a perfectionist, I know it’s going to take more than one video to change that, I know that this is the way you are and you’ve been probably been this way your whole life, but I think we all have an element of perfectionism to us. So even if you don’t consider yourself a perfectionist, like I don’t consider myself a perfectionist, but at the end of the day there are varying extents, degrees, of being a perfectionist.

So let’s just talk it through, and certainly if you are a perfectionist I encourage you to give this some thought. Give this some thought because at the end of the day you only live once, right? You were born on one date and you’re going to die on another date, and right now we’re in between these two somewhere. I know that’s a really stark way of looking at it, but this is your time. This is it. If you’re going to do something with your life, it’s got to happen now. You got to take action now or else your life will fly by faster than you can imagine. I’m 43 years old. I cannot believe how fast I went from 33 to 43. And if you’re older than me, then you’re probably like oh, you’re still young, but you know how fast it goes and if you’re younger than me, watch out because you’re going to be there pretty quick.

So, perfectionists. Perfectionists never take action. They don’t take action because they’re scared. They have a fear of rejection, a fear of failure. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase paralysis of analysis. They don’t take action because it’s not perfect. It’s not perfect, so they hold back. They’re like, “It’s not perfect. I’m not going to do it.”

Now, here’s the first thing I want you to think about. Starting something is a lot harder than changing direction later. Changing direction is actually quite simple to do. You calibrate, you change direction, you make little adjustments along the way – fairly easy to do. Starting something, that’s the hard part. It’s like starting a new habit. If you want to go to the gym, like maybe you don’t go to the gym and you want to start going to the gym, that’s difficult. It’s difficult to do. Or maybe starting a diet – it’s difficult to start a diet. But once you’re in the mode, once it’s part of your routine, then you can make adjustments much easier. So get this starting part out of the way with.

Start now. Start immediately with whatever it is you’re trying to do. If you’re trying to start a business or add a new element to your business or even something in your personal life, start it right away. Get that part done and then change direction later. Changing direction is a lot easier than starting. The whole process of calibration and improving is easy and it’s even fun because you’re incrementally improving your situation. It’s starting that’s the hard part. So start, jump in the deep end. Picture yourself on a diving board just holding your nose and, “Let’s do it.” Jump in. Be okay with not being perfect.

I get nervous all the time. I do 40 events a year, roughly. I get nervous almost every single time I get on stage, and I’ve had bad events. I’ve had bad events. I had one in Nashville that did not go well. I did one in Salt Lake City that didn’t go well. So I’ve had bad events. Be okay with imperfection because that knowledge of experience, whatever it is you tried, you start to build confidence even if it doesn’t work that well. You get more familiar with the process and you start to make adjustments and you get much more comfortable with the process.

One of the things that I do, obviously making videos is a huge part of my business, and part of my life, by the way, I love making these videos, but I follow a lot of other business video bloggers—excuse me, they call them vloggers, right—on YouTube, and one of the things I love to do is go to their channels and sort their videos by oldest first. And you can see their oldest videos, and quite often they’re clumsy and they’re awkward and they’re weird, and you know those vloggers the way they are today and you’ve become accustomed to who they’ve become, but they weren’t like that the whole time. When they first started out, it was new to them, too, and they were just learning. So it’s reassuring. And certainly I have some of my own old videos –not good at all. They’re horrible, but I learned. You learn and you get better as you move along.

A lot of people, they want to maintain their perfection. So let’s say they’re batting a thousand but they’ve only ever been up at bat twice. They hit the ball both times and so they’re batting a thousand. Well, that’s not life experience. You’re not making any progress. You have nothing to protect. You’re batting a thousand. It doesn’t mean anything. The failure is where you learn and improve anyway.

So go up to bat more and swing your bat, and even if you miss the ball, if you strike out or if you get some hits that aren’t the ones you want, that’s the process of learning. Have your goals associated with the process and not the results. So if it’s going up to bat, say, “I want to go up to bat 10 times,” regardless of what happens. Start becoming more process-oriented and less results-oriented or outcome-oriented.

People talk about outcome dependence. Their validity, getting validation in life or their mood, like being happy, not happy, is all based on the outcome of something. You have to change that. You have to be more process-oriented so you can be happy if you went through the process even if you didn’t get the outcome you wanted. If you become more process-oriented, then you have control over your emotions, not that element of random of what the eventual outcome is. That’s not in your control. You have control over the steps you take, the actions you take, so focus on those and have your goals associated with taking action on something, not whether it works or whether it doesn’t work. That immediately is going to give you more confidence and it’s going to give you a lot more control over your emotional state and your happiness or lack thereof in your life. Have all your goals be process-oriented.

And like I said before, if it doesn’t work—and I got to tell you, I try tons of things all the time and at least two-thirds of what I try does not work. Like my business is so riddled with failure, it’s incredible. I’m like a professional failure. I’ve failed at so many things because I constantly try new things and most of them don’t work. But when I try something and it fails, it allows me to learn. It allows me to calibrate. I’m like, “Okay, how did that work? How did it not work? Maybe if I try it this way or that way and I do it again and…oh, now it worked a little bit better.” You make more adjustments and eventually you really start to figure it out. But the reason it works is because you go out there and try more things, and if you’re a perfectionist you hold back from that.

So if you’re a total perfectionist, or even if you’re just a little bit of a perfectionist like we all are to some extent—in some areas I am too—my challenge to you is to try more things. Just take maybe the top five or 10 things that you’ve been meaning to try and just get them done, even if they fail, and just analyze and look at it and ask yourself, “Why did this work? Why did it not work?” and immediately you’ll start seeing that you’ll improve and move forward as a result.

Thanks for watching this video. My name is Patrick, encouraging you as always to think bigger about your business, think bigger about your life.

Patrick Schwerdtfeger is a keynote speaker who has spoken at conferences and conventions in North America, South America, Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Please click the button below to inquire about speaking fees and availability.
 

 

Jun 292014
 

 

 

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Patrick Schwerdtfeger is a motivational speaker who can speak about the cycle between success, complacency and failure, as well as the process of self-actualization, at your next business event. Contact us to check availability. The full transcript of this video is included below.

Hi and welcome to another edition of Strategic Business Insights. Today we’re going to talk about success and complacency. Success and complacency. Here’s what happens. A lot of people, they achieve success, they fight like crazy and they eventually achieve success, and then what happens? That breeds complacency. They get that mentality; it’s almost like a god complex, because they made it. They’re victorious. They won. They got what they wanted. They achieved success, and so now they know how it’s done. They’ve got this god complex. They figured it out. They can relax and celebrate and enjoy the fruits of their labor. And what does that lead to? Inevitably, it leads right back to failure. It leads right back to failure. Success often leads back to failure, and we’re going to talk about how to break that cycle.

But first, let’s just talk about the reality in a little bit more detail. You see this quite often with rich kids, kids of wealthy families, and certainly this was the case when I went to high school in Vancouver, Canada. We were lucky enough; my parents were absolutely not rich but they bought very well. They bought a house in a neighborhood that ended up doing very, very well. So I grew up in quite a wealthy neighborhood and there were a lot of children, a lot kids in my school that were very wealthy. And you see this all the time with rich kids, that they become complacent. They don’t have to work for it anymore. They don’t value the money because they live with it. They have already achieved it. They no longer identify with the struggle. They no longer identify with the struggle and all the failures along the way that led to that victory, to that wealth. And so what happens? They become lazy, they don’t work as hard, and the chances of them perpetuating their success are much lower.

And in fact, if you look at the American economy today—listen to this—a full 93% of millionaires in this country, the United States, are first-generation millionaires. In other words, they did not come from wealth; they built wealth on their own. And of that 93%, by the way, only 3% are professional athletes or actors or movie stars, so a full 90% are business owners and entrepreneurs, people perhaps like you, certainly like me, who built it from scratch. So in other words, the people who are children of wealthy people quite often squander it, and it’s the people who haven’t yet achieved it who work like crazy to inevitably achieve it in the end, and then after that maybe it’s their children who end up losing that drive.

And you also see this with entire companies. You even see it with civilizations. If you go back through history and you look at the Roman empire, the Greek empire, all these different empires and dynasties along the way, quite often there’s a rise to greatness, to success, and once they get there they start to have opulence and they have too much money, they get all relaxed, the entire society becomes a little more slack, a little more fat and happy, and inevitably they lose their spot at the top and eventually they’re taken over by some other dynasty. And it’s hard not to do this because we have a natural “me, me, me” attitude. That’s how human beings are.

Now, let’s talk about breaking the cycle, because this relates to one of the models of happiness and this is something I study quite a bit, something I’m very passionate about actually, is the science of happiness. And there are many different models of the science of happiness, I have videos on that, so if you’re interested go to my channel and search for happiness and you’ll find those videos. But one of the models talks about the three levels of happiness, and the first one is pleasure. We’re talking about the residual impact of happiness after the event. So the event takes place, how long does the happiness last before it goes back down? So the first one is pleasure; it goes down very quickly. So we’re talking about having a great meal, having sex with someone or doing drugs, anything, driving a fast car, super-fun, riding a rollercoaster, super-fun stuff but once it’s over the happiness drops off pretty quickly.

The second level is passion, doing something you’re passionate about, and the characteristic feature of this is people who lose track of time. So maybe you’re painting and you’re passionate about it, and so you lose track of time, or maybe you’re having a great conversation with someone so you lose track of time and it goes very quickly because you’re passionate about the topic, or maybe you’re playing sports or playing a musical instrument or whatever it is. So that’s passion; the happiness stays for a longer period of time.

But what’s that top level of happiness? Purpose. Purpose is when the activity becomes more than just about you. It becomes about everybody else. You make it about others. That’s what the characteristic feature about purpose is. For example, most parents consistently rank higher on purpose, a self-perceived purpose, than people who don’t have children because so much of their lives are devoted to making sure their child has a good lifestyle and a good upbringing. So that’s what purpose is all about.

And if you want to maintain your motivation, to maintain your success, you have to focus on purpose. You have to make your goals about the greater good, about humanity, about others. This is what self-actualization is about. This is what engagement, true engagement and fulfillment, is about, is when you finally share your mastery, your wisdom in whatever field you gained it, with greater humanity.

And you can do it for a profit—there’s nothing wrong with earning a profit, that’s what business is all about—but there are three levels in the business in terms of how a human being evolves in business. I have another video about this too. The first level is subsistence; you have to make enough money to pay your bills, and that’s very difficult sometimes when you’re getting started. The second is success. So now you have your bills paid and you have extra money, so you can do all these extra things. But the highest level is self-actualization, and again there, that’s purpose. That’s sharing your gift with somebody else.

So if you don’t focus on that, if you don’t focus on the greater good and on how humanity and others can benefit from what you’ve built for yourself, you’re going to end up losing your motivation and that success is going to lead to complacency, and that complacency is going to lead to failure or at least there’s a high probability that that’s going to happen. Instead, if you want to maintain that success, you have to maintain your motivation, and the only way to do that is to make it about others. That’s what this video series is about. I’m trying to do this myself. And I’m not saying I’ve achieved it by any stretch, but I’m trying to make it about others because it keeps me motivated. Because as my number of subscribers grows on YouTube and I get new followers and people send me nice messages, it helps me realize that we can all share our expertise—not just me or not just you, anybody—and other people can benefit, and that keeps my motivation going. And it’s something that I encourage for you as well because if you don’t, the thing you fought so hard for can reverse itself and collapse. I’ve seen it happen, I’m sure you have too, and it’s horrible to watch. I wouldn’t want it for you and I certainly wouldn’t want it for me.

Thanks so much for watching this video. My name is Patrick, reminding you as always to think bigger about your business, think bigger about your life.

Patrick Schwerdtfeger is a keynote speaker who has spoken at conferences and conventions in North America, South America, Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Please click the button below to inquire about speaking fees and availability.
 

 

Jun 232014
 

 

 

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Patrick Schwerdtfeger is a motivational speaker who can speak about the aggregation of marginal gains at your next business event. Contact us to check availability. The full transcript of this video is included below.

Hi and welcome to another edition of Strategic Business Insights. Someone sent me an article the other day, which I read. It was fantastic. It was about the aggregation of marginal gains. The aggregation of marginal gains, and it was fascinating. It was all about improving everything by just 1%. What would happen if you improved everything in your life just a tiny little bit?

And in particular the article was about Dave Brailsford, who’s the coach of the UK cycling team, a new coach with the UK cycling team, and the UK cycling team has done extraordinarily well. And his entire philosophy was to do exactly this: To look at everything from the food they were eating to how to get a better night’s sleep to how to get a better seed on the actual bike itself, but there were things related to cycling and things that seemed unrelated completely, like the quality of pillow that you sleep on to get a better night’s sleep. There were dozens and dozens of different things where his primary objective was to improve everything just a little bit. And then sure enough, the team ended up doing extraordinarily well and has been in the news as being a tremendous success story over the last few years, this whole notion of increasing everything by just a little bit, tiny little improvements.

And this relates to my entire opinion about success and greatness and all the things that I talk about in my videos, is that people always look for an overnight success story and it’s very, very rare to have a true overnight success story. The vast majority of people, for years and years, they’re doing little things, little things, improving, improving, making it a little bit bigger, a little bit better, a little bit better, constantly making tiny little adjustments, and incrementally it’s like building a brick building one brick at a time. Each brick on its own, it’s not big. It doesn’t mean anything. But when you keep stacking them, keep stacking them, eventually it starts to take shape and you get walls and you put the whole building together, but you build it tiny victories at a time.

I’ve always thought that success is the accumulation of 10,000 tiny victories and probably 100,000 tiny failures. That’s the whole process of trying things and pushing past your limits and trying to learn and trying to improve just that tiny little bit, and a lot of times it won’t work but sometimes it will and you incrementally improve a tiny bit each time, maybe 1% each time. Well, like any compound interest chart, you’re going to see that it’s going to be slow at the beginning, hardly anything’s changing, but then it starts to pick up speed and the whole thing takes on an exponential curve and all of a sudden it starts to go…

I just did a video about this not long ago about you reap what you sow. It’s the same thing. You got to do these things and just keep nurturing, keep nurturing that seed, keep trying to improve things, make things a tiny bit better, and not just related to your work but related to everything in your life. And what ends up happening is that you start to build that foundation, and when the foundation’s there it’s like the root system of a tree. Once those roots are there, that’s when the tree can start to grow higher. Aggregate marginal gains, right? Fascinating.

And by the way, the reverse is also true. When you have someone who’s got bad luck, for example, I hate it when people talk about being unlucky because nine times out of 10 bad luck is the accumulation of dozens of tiny bad decisions, tiny bad decisions made day after day after day, or times where you could have done more and chose not to. I mean, I know that there are situations where people are genuinely lucky or genuinely unlucky, but for the vast majority of cases when people have bad luck or things are not going well in their life, it’s the accumulation of dozens or even hundreds of tiny bad decisions as compared to hundreds of tiny good decisions, can make an enormous difference in the quality of a person’s life and the success that they achieve during their lifetime.

So focus on the little things. Focus on the one percent. Try to improve everything just a tiny little bit and in time you’re going to see things take shape, and I wish you luck. I wish myself luck in the same venture.

My name is Patrick. Thanks so much for watching this video. And remember, always think bigger about your business, think bigger about your life.

Patrick Schwerdtfeger is a keynote speaker who has spoken at conferences and conventions in North America, South America, Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Please click the button below to inquire about speaking fees and availability.
 

 

Jun 152014
 

 

 

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Patrick Schwerdtfeger is a motivational speaker who can cover the topic of sales training and the Law of State Transfer at your next business event. Contact us to check availability. The full transcript of the above video is included below.

Hi and welcome to another edition of Strategic Business Insights. Today we’re going to talk about the law of state transfer. What is the law of state transfer? Well, it’s something that is discussed quite often in social dynamics theory. It’s discussed in sales. It’s discussed with any type of human interaction analysis. Anyone who’s researching human interaction might refer to something called the law of state transfer. And what are we actually talking about? We’re talking about the fact that if I’m excited and I’m speaking with you, there’s a good chance that you’re going to start to get excited just because I’m excited. And likewise, if I’m negative, if I’m frustrated, if I’m angry, there’s a good chance that my state, my emotional state, will transfer onto you.

Now, this is accentuated if you’re the alpha in the conversation. So what does that mean? Well, in any situation, there’s going to be kind of a dominant communicator in the situation. You could look at groups of people at a social event or talking in a park or in a business environment, a networking environment, at a club at night or a restaurant – there’s always going to be one person who tends to be more dominant than the other. Well, in that situation, the person who’s acting as the alpha in that situation, their state is going to transfer more than the other people’s state will transfer.

Now, this is super-important when it comes to sales because, number one, in a sales situation, if you’re in sales—and frankly we’re all in sales in one area of our life or another so sales is a part of human existence. It’s certainly a part of business. So if you’re an entrepreneur or self-employed the way I am, sales is a regular part of your life. And even when you’re communicating with your spouse or your kids or your friends, there is an element of sales to all of those communications. Well, in sales training, one of the things that they need to teach people, and if they haven’t then I would say it’s probably not a very good sales course, is that you have to be the alpha in the conversation. So you have to be the dominant contributor to whatever the dialogue is going on. How do you do that? Well, as one example, the person who’s asking the questions is generally in the alpha situation. “So how do you feel about this? What is it that you’re looking for? What are you working on?” The person who’s asking questions is leading the conversation. So that’s essentially the alpha role in the conversation.

So if you’re in sales and you’re the alpha in the conversation, which you should be, then you need to know that your state is going to transfer to the person you’re speaking with, the prospect, the customer, whoever that might be. What does that mean? It means you have to believe in the product. When they say “you have to love your product” or “if you love your product, sales is easy,” that’s referring to the law of state transfer because if I believe in my heart that this is the solution, this is going to solve the person’s problem, then that emotional conviction in my mind is going to transfer to the person I’m speaking with and they’re going to inevitably start to feel the same way because they see it in me.

Now, what’s the flip side of that? What if you’re unsure? What if deep down inside you don’t necessarily believe in the product you’re selling? They’re going to know. They’re going to know. People know. People sense this kind of stuff. As human beings, we notice thousands of subtle little cues, little subcommunications, be they our eyes or how flush our skin is or how animated our facial expressions are. People sense that kind of stuff. Even when babies are just a few days old, they can already distinguish between a smiling face and a frowning face, and it’s 7 months. Seven months, babies already take your facial expressions as social cues for how they should be acting. So we’re hardwired to do this. Human beings are hardwired to look at each other’s all these thousands of little differences that take place when you really believe in something and you’re confident and you have conviction in it, versus another situation where maybe you’re not so sure and you don’t have that same level of belief. They’re going to notice it. They’re going to notice it. So you have to know, if you’re in sales and you’re selling a product that you don’t believe in, it’s going to be an uphill battle. It’s going to be an uphill battle for you.

Now, for me, I’m a speaker, that’s what I do for a living, so I have to get up in front of these people and speak. And the whole point for me, in other words, how this same concept applies to my own career, is that if I want the audience to get excited about my message, I have to be excited about it first. In other words, we always have to find the emotion we’re looking for in ourselves before we can expect to find it in somebody else. We have to find that emotion within ourselves. If I want people to laugh, I have to see the humor in what I’m saying first. I have to see it as funny myself if I expect the audience to laugh. I have to see the excitement and the opportunity and the implications of my message myself if I expect the audience to see it for themselves.

So this is true in all sorts of different situations. Now, let’s just talk about this within the realm of your personal life because it applies there too. If you want your partner, let’s say someone you’re in a relationship with, if you want them to share with you and talk about personal intimate subjects—maybe there’s a conversation that you want to have with that person and you’re afraid to do it because you don’t think they are going to share, you don’t feel that they’re going to be vulnerable themselves and be willing to talk about that intimate subject—you have to find that emotion within yourself first before you can expect to get it out of the other person. And I’m not saying it’s going to work every time because there are some people who hate talking about these sorts of personal subjects, so it may or may not work.

And by the way, the other is true as well. If you react to someone with anger, if you are angry at someone, there’s a good chance that that state is going to transfer as well and they’re going to react with anger back. That’s why arguments happen. That’s how arguments start, is that one person gets angry and starts yelling and screaming and the other person inevitably reacts in that same way and starts yelling and screaming back. So the state is just elevating and they’re just working their way up the ladder and getting more and more heated as time goes on.

So in all of these situations the purpose of this video is just to encourage you, like so many of my other videos, to heighten your level of awareness, cultivate awareness. Try to be more aware of how the state…like if you wake up one morning and you’re in a bad mood, if you don’t fix that bad mood, that state is going to transfer to other people in your life and they’re going to be in a bad mood back. The world is a reflection of yourself; I have a video on that. The world is a reflection of yourself. If you’re mean to people, they’re going to be mean back. If you’re kind to people, they’re going to be kind back. So cultivate awareness.

Let’s say you’ve had a bad day at work. When you go home to be with your spouse or your children, you need to know that that bad mood is going to transfer to them, so you need to deal with it on your drive home. Find a way to let it go. Find a way to let it go so you can be with your spouse and be positive. And if you’re positive with that person, or with those people in the case of your children, you’ve got a higher probability that they’re going to be positive back. It’s called the law of state transfer. And if you’re the alpha in any given situation, it happens every single day.

Thanks so much for watching. I appreciate it. My name is Patrick, reminding you as always to think bigger about your business, think bigger about your life.

Patrick Schwerdtfeger is a keynote speaker who has spoken at conferences and conventions in North America, South America, Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Please click the button below to inquire about speaking fees and availability.